Unity and the iPhone OS 4.0, update

April 14, 2010 in Technology

Dear Unity developers,

I wanted to take a moment today to follow up on my blog post last Friday regarding the recent controversial changes in the the iPhone OS 4.0 beta ToS. The news about this change from Apple has drawn a lot of attention and stirred up very strong emotions in many developer communities, including ours. There’s also been a great deal of commentary about how these changes will be interpreted and applied by Apple and still more discussion about Apple’s intent with these changes. Unity learned of these changes with the rest of you just last Thursday and today, there remains a great deal of uncertainty about these changes being final and what we may need to do to comply.

We’re meeting with Apple next week to discuss the matter, and our engineers have been discussing possible technical solutions as well. Of course, we’ll provide you with immediate updates as soon as we have any new information.

Just in case the ToS changes do end up being a problem, we’re already working hard to find and implement solutions to maintain uninterrupted compliance with Apple’s ToS.

Though any uncertainly about Unity’s future on this platform is unpleasant, our feeling is that we’ll be okay. We remain firmly committed to providing you with the very best game engine for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. Thank you all so much for your patience and support. It means everything to us.

Update: Unity and the iPhone OS 4.0, update II

Comments (103)

Subscribe to comments
  1. Aras Pranckevičius

    May 19, 2010 at 8:49 pm / 

    @Bruce: as my comment just above your says… an update is here: http://blogs.unity3d.com/2010/05/11/unity-and-the-iphone-os-4-0-update-ii/

  2. Bruce

    May 19, 2010 at 4:21 pm / 

    We are coming up on a month since this post was… posted. In my personal dealings with Apple I learned that this generally means one of two things.

    1. Unity is an approved Apple development platform and they are considering the coporate purchase of Unity. Apple purchasing Unity would be a wonderful thing in my eyes. The product is powerful and surprisingly user friendly. And the corporate and public support is quite simpy, fantastic. They are then possibly discussing the terms and waiting to break the incredible news to us all.

    or

    2. Unity does not comply with Apple’s ToS. They are then attempting to discover a work around before telling the world. They may have to make some subtle or serious changes before it does comply with ToS, or they just don’t know how to tell us and their consumers that iPhone/iPad deployment is at an end.

    Either way their is no courtesy given to those who are looking to build games and tools using the Unity platform. With the Apple purchase all will be forgiven, but if Unity does not comply then a courtesy note would be more in order as the backlash for keeping all in the dark could be damaging for the brand. Brand transparency today is more important than ever and at the moment I fear this is not the case with Unity. When things got hot for Apple with Flash, Steve took upon himself to speak out to the masses. Unity team… what are you going to do?

  3. Aras Pranckevičius

    May 13, 2010 at 12:33 pm / 

    @doug and @Joel-Noel: Update on the situation two days ago: http://blogs.unity3d.com/2010/05/11/unity-and-the-iphone-os-4-0-update-ii/

  4. Jean-Noel

    May 13, 2010 at 8:08 am / 

    It has nearly been a month since your update on this matter. I like many others I am sure are sitting on the fence of “should we purchase a licence or not”.

    Did the meeting occur? How did it go? Should I continue developing in OpenGL ;) Are you going to save me from this pain.

  5. doug

    May 12, 2010 at 7:58 pm / 

    From the text:
    ” We’re meeting with Apple next week to discuss the matter ”

    What happened ?

  6. Joseph

    May 11, 2010 at 1:40 am / 

    Hi there, is there any new news with Apple compliance? btw Unity3d is awesome!

  7. Glenno

    May 10, 2010 at 12:11 pm / 

    Yep, I’m with Tonio, any further news? Even if its just to know that there’s some sort of talks/movement still ongoing. Or has there been a post elsewhere that i’ve missed?

  8. Sean Ramsay

    May 8, 2010 at 4:50 pm / 

    We are coming up on a month since this post was… posted. In my personal dealings with Apple I learned that this generally means one of two things.

    1. Unity is an approved Apple development platform and they are considering the coporate purchase of Unity. Apple purchasing Unity would be a wonderful thing in my eyes. The product is powerful and surprisingly user friendly. And the corporate and public support is quite simpy, fantastic. They are then possibly discussing the terms and waiting to break the incredible news to us all.

    or

    2. Unity does not comply with Apple’s ToS. They are then attempting to discover a work around before telling the world. They may have to make some subtle or serious changes before it does comply with ToS, or they just don’t know how to tell us and their consumers that iPhone/iPad deployment is at an end.

    Either way their is no courtesy given to those who are looking to build games and tools using the Unity platform. With the Apple purchase all will be forgiven, but if Unity does not comply then a courtesy note would be more in order as the backlash for keeping all in the dark could be damaging for the brand. Brand transparency today is more important than ever and at the moment I fear this is not the case with Unity. When things got hot for Apple with Flash, Steve took upon himself to speak out to the masses. Unity team… what are you going to do?

  9. Jose Luis

    May 7, 2010 at 5:28 pm / 

    Me too, Tonio. I’m waiting for a response from Unity people to buy or not.

  10. Dean

    May 6, 2010 at 9:56 am / 

    It would be nice to have some kind of news. Any kind! I have actually people and contracts depending on this and the situation is getting ridiculous

  11. Jesper

    May 5, 2010 at 3:49 pm / 

    It’s been over a week. Almost a month. How’s it going? *worried*

  12. Dean

    May 5, 2010 at 12:04 am / 

    This is really getting ridiculous. I agree with Richard Brooksby. At least you could say “something”. People are waiting to spend money on unity and on apple too after all.

  13. Tonio Loewald

    May 4, 2010 at 11:13 pm / 

    It would be kind of nice if you followed up on this post. The situation now is just as vague as it was when this was posted.

  14. HH

    May 4, 2010 at 6:06 pm / 

    Here I just bought iphone pro for Unity. Hope Unity comments soon as I am starting to get nervous.

  15. Richard Brooksby

    May 4, 2010 at 2:23 pm / 

    I think Unity really should post something on this blog about the situation, even if it’s “no news yet”. Silence is worrying.

  16. Chris

    May 3, 2010 at 4:54 pm / 

    Any news on the matter? I am planning to jump into Unity with the single purpose to develop for Iphone, so any updated insight about Unity´s future on that platform would be appreciated.

    Thx
    Chris

  17. Cascho

    May 2, 2010 at 5:10 pm / 

    I would like Unity to focus on Android as soon as possible…

  18. Hayden Peake

    May 2, 2010 at 11:21 am / 

    I think Steve’s open letter should help to determine that Unity isn’t a problem. To repeat a section of the quote above for clarity:

    “We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.”

    Of course, this absolutely *doesn’t* describe Unity’s support for these devices. One of the key reasons I’m using Unity for my current project is that I can write any Objective-C or C++ code I want within the XCode project, and Unity just injects it’s stuff too. I can easily call out to that Objective-C code from any C# that exists within my Unity project. So I’m not even reliant on Unity supporting every feature of the underlying OS, although generally it does a superb job of doing so. The flexible way that Unity for iPhone is implemented effectively means that Unity can be view as a library (from the perspective of the XCode toolchain) — it doesn’t stop you as a developer doing anything whatsoever directly with the native tools, it just provides a collection of great, extremely useful, functionality.

    Hopefully Apple are receptive to this important point when, surely, it is raised with them by the Unity team.

  19. iBrent

    April 30, 2010 at 10:45 pm / 

    @cornchild,

    Adobe has already let it go. –> http://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2010/04/moving_forward.html

    The question is, what is Unity doing about it.

    iBrent

  20. Matt McArdell

    April 30, 2010 at 2:42 am / 

    Ah, that said, I do think developers should be able to choose a slower implementation if it suits their purposes and they get other benefits from doing this.

    I guess that my point is that the behaviour coding for unity could be implemented in C++ rather than some other layer on top (again dependent on language features and libraries released by the mono project).

  21. Matt McArdell

    April 30, 2010 at 2:38 am / 

    All reasonable. C++, for example, is a language that can be compiled natively on many platforms and it would be a compliant (relating to the iPhone SDK agreement) and a faster approach to use C++ for coding our behaviours.
    I guess some of the scripting languages have more extensive introspection features which I assume unity relies on for finding handler methods. Interfaces and registration mechanisms however allow better design and are faster.
    Unity must compile and generate an xcode project anyway, it might as well just copy C++ source files over. I guess it might make it harder to limit functionality (ie the current custom plugin layer that allows punch through to access to OS features).

    I saw mention of Unity meeting with Apple a couple of weeks ago. Any news on this?

  22. David Whatley

    April 29, 2010 at 11:17 pm / 

    Apple has said something official, right from Steve Jobs: http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/

    Steve talks about why No Flash. But here’s the part that seems scary for Unity:

    == Begin Quote ==

    We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

    This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

    == End Quote ==

    Essentially this describes Unity3D as well. It’s cross platform (author once, play anywhere) and a layer between. (huge sigh)

    This is not ideal for Apple. And their issues with Flash are spilling over. Either intentional or unintentionally… but they are.

    — David
    Author: geoDefehse, geoDefense Swarm

  23. cornchild

    April 29, 2010 at 8:46 pm / 

    today Jobs made it clear that they are after Adobe and flash. BUT now the ball is in Adobe’s hand. Adobe can decide to let it go or sue Apple and take down the rest with them (Unity and others)

  24. iBrent

    April 29, 2010 at 5:34 pm / 

    Looks like we have our answer from Apple –> http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/

    “If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.”

    Bye Bye Unity for iPhone.

    iBrent

  25. Dell Lawrence

    April 27, 2010 at 6:50 am / 

    Before we all get too worked up over this Apple and Unity issue over the new dev agreement… let’s keep in mind that Unity and Apple have not made any official announcement. This means that is may very well be that Unity and Apple will soon come to an agreement beneficial to all parties.

    If that is indeed the case and I still stand behind this as the most likely outcome of all… then the best course of action is to keep developing and not stop. Worst case scenario you can release your app for OS X and Windows and who knows how many other consumer platforms which will soon be supported by Unity.

    If you design your app correctly you will be able to do this with the least amount of dev effort possible. This is smart to to regardless of what Apple and Unity do.

    The sky is not falling…. Keep developing your app and move forward… Don’t waste anymore pixels and brain cells worrying about the low possibility of a negative outcome…

    I read of people in this forum who are putting their development on hold until this issue is resolved. I think they are making a huge mistake. Also what about all the time wasted that could be used to further learn the process of developing apps with Unity?

    So don’t listen to the naysayers, and keep developing. From a business and software dev standpoint this is the wisest course of action. You stand to gain in the short and long run by not overreacting to fears that are based on “What if company X does Y and we all lose?”… Really do you think that is what is going to happen? Really?? Think about it…

    Keep calm and keep developing! Best, Dell

  26. spacefrog

    April 26, 2010 at 11:28 am / 

    Gregory:
    OC there is some truth in what you are saying about other devices (PSP, NDS, etc…) are more restricted and expensive to develop for, BUT:
    Apple came with the promise EVERYONE can get into app-development, and that they provide a plattform to sell small apps for people developing for a $99 fee. And i think nobody can deny that this was EXACTLY the reason the AppStore (and the iDevices themselves) became that successfull and popular. Of course, for Apple success might be only defined by HUGE $ rolling in (not those app peanuts), and the whole app approvement process, the payout handling etc.. cost them more than it earns. Their whole stance on the App-Store and App development for anybody is on question here. But than again all arguments (App quality suffering by “intermediate” layers etc). from Apple are misinformative and ridiculous. Apple attracted a lot of developers in the first term due their open policy, and in turn cashed in alot on devices sold jsut because of all the youngsters starting to play games on ther iDevices, because they like games available for cheap money. And now everybody should stay calm and say “okay” to this new POS OS4 Beta Agrrement ? After the devs gave Apple sales this initial boost ? Definitely don’t think so…

  27. Brian

    April 25, 2010 at 2:25 pm / 

    I was planning to continue iPhone and iPad development with Unity. I was also working on some business apps with Flash. Now it looks like both may be dead, although Flash more so.

    This isn’t the first time I’ve been screwed by Apple. In the late 90’s I wrote apps for Mac OS 7 using CodeWarrior. This was for the Motorola 68K chip. Then Apple came out with the PPC, and we had to rewrite. When OS X came out we had to rewrite again (still with CodeWarrior targeting Carbon). When Snow Leopard came out, we had to modify our apps yet again. Needless to say, CodeWarrior for Mac was discontinued. But I refuse to learn Objective C to target Mac only. I suspect that once the next version of OS X comes out, Rosetta will be dropped entirely, which will render all of our Carbon apps unusable.

    On the contrary, the Windows apps we wrote for Windows 3.1 and Windows 95 still work pretty much without changes. Microsoft supports backward compatibility. Apple couldn’t care less. Apple may decide to support Unity on the iPhone today, but next year they’ll come out with a new OS and will drop it without a second thought.

  28. reallyjoel

    April 25, 2010 at 12:00 pm / 

    “next week” has come and gone.

  29. Gregory Pierce

    April 25, 2010 at 12:52 am / 

    I’m thankful that Unity and Apple will be having some conversations about whether or not they can get things to work out right. At the end of the day its highly likely that you guys will be able to make it work and I have been investing a lot of time and energy working with your technology and writing tutorials and such to help this community.

    As for many of the other comments that I’ve seen, I assure you that Apple is far – VERY far from unique in this area. If you’ve ever done any professional game development for the major platforms, this type of activity is not exactly alien. That Apple didn’t impose some bigger “authorized middleware platform” program actually speaks volumes for the opportunity that Apple has made available to developers. Many of you probably have not been involved with console providers approving or rejecting your COMPANY from working on a platform because you didn’t fit their criteria for what a 3rd party developer should look like. I encourage you to openly apply for a console kit and see what a REAL walled garden looks like.

    That said, it if unfortunate that Apple has changed the rules of how one can compete on its platform – but they, as others have mentioned, will do what they have to do to maintain things for the end-user and not for the developer. Apple has ALWAYS been that way – this is nothing new. Microsoft was this way with Java developers at one point though their goal was to engage the developers and tie them to their platform – which they accomplished with DirectX. Adobe was the same way with Flash, killing off developer attempts to reverse engineer the Flash player for YEARS before they finally gave up and released part of the technology as open.

    From the business perspective this is a very clear example of building and protecting a platform and its ecosystem and it really shouldn’t surprise anyone. Its unfortunate, but it isn’t new, it isn’t exclusive to Apple, and in many instances it is far far better a relationship than developers (especially independent developers) have EVER EVER EVER had for a platform. If you disagree, I encourage you to find an open SDK for the Nintendo DS or the PSP and write code for their platform that you intend to sell in stores without their permission. Unfortunately, this is just the way of things. As indie developers, the best we can do is move to an alternate platform. Personally I have no intention of doing that because I’ve been around that space long enough to know that it never really gets “better” and in the interim all you end up doing is weakening your financial position and risking your business.

  30. Spacefrog

    April 24, 2010 at 4:24 pm / 

    Thanks Duke for posting such a well worded and lengthy text, which IMHO hits the nail on the head pretty good, describing the problematic thing with Apple and the Appstore. After the last few days rants and fan/hate posts ran wild, so reading well thought text on the matter is balsam on my soul. For me i just sit and wait for the outcome, though i can’t help checking all possible sources for news. One is shure to me, Apple always had a bit of a warm, nostalgic place in my Heart, because i always saw them as the more successfull and professional twin of the good old Amiga, which i was a long time follower of, till it sunk irretrievable. But since i started to deal with Apple (about a year ago) because of iPhone development, i more and more got peeved because of their attitude towards developers. And this last two weeks clearly made me hate Apple and the people who are responsible there for this kind of “customer relationship” handling…

  31. Duke

    April 24, 2010 at 2:17 pm / 

    This situation has been dragging on for far too long now. The fact that this issue has been allowed to persist for so long really tells me everything I need to know:

    If you are a developer, Apple is not serious about having you as a business partner. Rather, their view seems to be that they see developers as serfs in their fiefdom. You serve at Apple’s pleasure, and they MAY allow you to profit from the fruits of your labor so long as you follow their ever-changing and inconsistently-applied rules.

    I sent a direct question to Apple myself about the new TOS terms when this all started, even before Unity Technologies got involved. I’m still waiting for a response, but I’m not holding my breath. My carefully worded and polite query was probably round-filed. That’s a very contemptful way to treat someone who is interested in being a business partner.

    Apple is most certainly aware that many of their business partners have investments in the tens of thousands of dollars hanging in the balance waiting for this issue to be decided. Again, the fact that Apple has not provided any form of clarification after two weeks of FUD speaks volumes about the amount of contempt that Apple has toward their business partners, even those who have invested significantly in the iDevice platforms.

    I used to take all of the stories about arbitrary and capricious App Store rejections with a grain of salt. It is impossible for me to do the same now that I’ve been this close to the fire and nearly got burned. I am wrapping up my first Unity project, and my second project in Unity was to be an iPad game. I was literally several hours away from plunking down a couple thousand dollars for everything I needed to do iPad development (iPad, Mac Mini, iPhone Dev Kit, Unity IPhone) when this situation arose.

    Since then I have put my iPad development plans on indefinite hold, and have been doing a lot of soul-searching about whether I can feel confident and comfortable working with a business partner as fickle as Apple, a business partner who is apparently completely comfortable with threatening to ban the very technologies that have driven many of the top applications written for their platform. The answer is that I cannot arrive at a position of confidence and comfort with Apple as a business partner.

    Every executive must make their own decisions for their own businesses. There are many businesses whose pockets are deep enough that they can afford a $10,000+ spin on the roulette wheel that is Apple’s app store approval process. That gamble may even pay off for some of those businesses. My company, however, is not a company that can afford those sort of high-stakes games at this time.

    Should I target the iDevice platforms in the near to mid-term future, it will only be as a secondary platform for an already completed project, and only with minimal investment. I am not so prideful as to completely discount a platform that obviously has a good amount of success associated with it, but at the same time, I am too prudent to risk the future of a company still in its infancy by working with a business partner that would snub my company without a second thought. I find it a just and coincidental irony that this denies Apple the product exclusivity that they so highly crave from their developers.

    I recognize that none of the blame for this mess rests with Unity Technologies. Unity is as much of a victim in this situation as the rest of us. Unity Technologies has been a great business partner so far, and has allowed me far closer to my aspirations than I have ever been. I look forward to working with Unity Technologies for many years to come.

  32. slopester

    April 24, 2010 at 1:15 pm / 

    What professional wants to work with and support ahole partners like Apple? Not me thanks, some things are more important than money. Android support is paramount to restore CHOICE.
    Unity team, as always, awesome. Much respect.

  33. Marco

    April 24, 2010 at 11:53 am / 

    Keep up the good work. I think it is important to maintain good relations with Steve, but begin serving other platforms (android) as well, cause Apple is becoming a bit cocky and unpredicatable.

  34. Brad

    April 23, 2010 at 11:30 pm / 

    I know in your own way you are competition with Appcelerator, and Corona, and a few others… But you may want to do a brainstorming with them to figure out a way to get around this require less time money and effort. Because during development you can bouncing off one another to get around 3.3.1… Like using Ruby Cocoa

  35. Brad

    April 23, 2010 at 10:42 pm / 

    Wanted to put this recommendation here as well. It may provide some answers.

    Wonder if we can use Ruby since MacRuby is under development (mac to Obj-C)… and Ruby Cocoa which is also “OKed” (older Ruby to Obj-C bridge) for apple apps. Used quite often in Cocoa development. Apple would have little room to complain… or at least get away with it.

  36. TheGame

    April 23, 2010 at 4:57 pm / 

    Please update us, high time to decide whether to continue with unity or not.

    please stop your unity iphone purchase for some time until you have solution, i know many users are planning to buy iphone version, we might end up buying a tool which can no longer support iphone.

  37. Peter D

    April 23, 2010 at 3:42 pm / 

    It’s getting pretty late on Friday (euro time) but, it’s actually still rediculously early Apple time. Hopefully the blog get’s updated sometime after 4pm today.

    It would be poor form of Unity not to update us either way by close of play today.

  38. Superwaugi

    April 23, 2010 at 1:04 pm / 

    I´m sooooo waiting for any news in this matter….checking the blog every few minutes. The meeting must be over by now, so please inform us…even bad news are better than no news….
    All the best to you!
    Superwaugi

  39. Simon

    April 23, 2010 at 1:03 pm / 

    Missing an update here, David.

  40. Brad

    April 22, 2010 at 7:16 pm / 

    Hope so.

    If we do not here by EOBD this Friday, most likely Apple’s 3.3.1 is being enforced against Unity as well (and probably Apcelerator and Corona, and other groups). Unity would probably not post to the Blog of the meeting until after they come to the decision of… Do they simply dis-continue support for iPhone… Or do they have and effective, efficient and relatively future proof (again relatively) way to get arround 3.3.1 at least in concept and or on paper to give the bad news of “No they can not code for iPhone OS 4.0, but we do have some good news” to give a positive twist for the story.

  41. IpadDev

    April 22, 2010 at 3:47 am / 

    The post says there was a meeting taking place this week. So I suppose we will see a new post with an update post-apple-meeting. Crossing fingers! I want to start development right away!

  42. greghudd

    April 21, 2010 at 9:15 pm / 

    add me to the chorus of voices that side with you on this issue… //GH

  43. Sumner

    April 21, 2010 at 4:25 pm / 

    Well… the apple-scratch-app link does show an app created by a good friend of Steve Jobs getting canned… but that is because it has a live script interpreter running.

    UT/Mono’s AOT compiler get’s around that issue nicely.

    If Apple does kill Unity iPhone, then I’ll jump on the Android bandwagon…

    Unity fanboi, not Apple fanboi

    :)
    Sumner

  44. Nintari

    April 21, 2010 at 10:47 am / 

  45. G. Scott

    April 21, 2010 at 6:56 am / 

    I’d be interested in seeing more webOS and Android support. Unity is too good.

  46. MADFINGER Games

    April 20, 2010 at 8:21 am / 

    Thank you for keeping us update.. We’ll be crossing our mad fingers …

  47. Sean Baggaley

    April 19, 2010 at 11:05 pm / 

    @Soulhuntre:

    Apple don’t *hate* developers. They simply aren’t developer-centric. Apple’s philosophy is that the End User is God.

    This is extremely unusual in the IT industry, where the major players have historically placed developers on a pedestal. Microsoft is actually a development tools and technologies company; Windows is just a handy wrapper for those technologies, rather than an end in itself. (The FSF takes an even more fundamentalist approach: “Code is God! End users can pay for support if they don’t get the weird and wonderful UIs we come up with!”)

    What you’re experiencing is actually not uncommon even on the desktop version of Apple’s OS X: Apple *expect* developers to adhere by their Human Interface Guidelines (which is a *very* long, and anally detailed document) as a matter of course. Apple will cheerfully break APIs to force developers to keep their apps up-to-date and consistent with OS X’s GUI state of the art.

    Programmers are not important at Apple. They don’t call the shots. THIS is what creates the intense emotions between Apple and non-Apple users. It’s no coincidence that most of the hatred of Apple comes from those with a programming or engineering background.

  48. Michael Voigt

    April 19, 2010 at 9:22 pm / 

    I find it quite interesting that a rogue iphone was just found in a bar , timely? It has definitely diverted attention from the TOS stuff involving adobe and unity.

  49. Steve Taylor

    April 18, 2010 at 4:46 am / 

    > I hope apple are just forcing out flash due to its stability and performance issues

    I half agree – I think this is primarily aimed at Flash, but that Apple’s main concern is to maintain a complete lockdown on what is run on their machine, and that Apple’s concerns about stability are mostly a smokescreen.

    Sigh – life *used* to be so simple. You just had to remember that Microsoft were the evil ones…

  50. Sasha

    April 17, 2010 at 2:34 pm / 

    I was literally one click away from purchasing a new iMac explicitly so that I can tie up Unity3D with a box that I can use for Mac, Windows, iPhone and iPad development. I decided to wait a couple of weeks until I release my latest project and now all this…
    For a small developer like myself, Unity3D is a force multiplier. I did develop a couple of 3d games long ago using DirectX retained mode and it’s not for a faint hearted. Writing thousands of lines of dense code presents that many opportunities to put a parenthesis at the wrong place or forget to type cast something.
    //end rant
    Anyways I hope the issue will be resolved soon. Evo4g and that Courier tablet are getting more tempting every day…

  51. Richard Brooksby

    April 17, 2010 at 8:41 am / 

    Honest + openness + great software = win.

  52. Ugur

    April 17, 2010 at 1:11 am / 

    Typo, should be “This is why i love Unity, you guys do great work” of course =)

  53. Ugur

    April 17, 2010 at 1:10 am / 

    Great post David.
    This is why i love Unity, you guys to great work and are friendly thoughtful honest fellas, some things one can´t expect from many other companies.
    I´m so convinced in UT that i preordered Unity 3 with the iPhone Pro license, too today, i know you guys will do your best to get things going and hey, even if it shouldn´t be possible at all with unity iPhone (though i feel like it should be fine because it deploys an xcode project at the end, unlike the flash solution for example), one can still do wicked stuff for many platforms with unity.

  54. Hamranhansenhansen

    April 17, 2010 at 12:44 am / 

    > i think if things like this keep happening apple will loose

    No, what Apple is doing is protecting the platform. I don’t think that will mean excluding Unity, because it makes Xcode projects. The individual developer is still responsible for actually creating and maintaining the application, and Apple will likely accept or reject it on an individual basis. But understand that the just-released Flash CS5 creates iPhone OS v3 application packages directly, without Xcode. You don’t use Apple’s compiler, you can’t run in the simulator, you can’t use any of the testing tools, you can’t compile for new architectures, you can’t maintain your own app responsibly. Flash is on a 24 month development cycle, and it is already 12 months behind iPhone OS (it makes v3 apps) which is on a 12 month cycle. So when Apple introduces iPhone OS v6 in mid-2012, the current version of Flash will still be CS5, the one that makes iPhone OS v3 apps. How much work is Apple expected to do to keep those apps running for users because the app developer can’t maintain them responsibly?

    So good luck to Unity and Unity developers, I hope everything gets worked out in your favor. But the idea that Apple did something arbitrary or malicious is ridiculous. They had no choice but to shut down Flash-built apps right now. App Store is a commercial market. If you want to get paid you have to meet a higher standard in development practices than what Flash CS5 enables.

  55. C. Michael Neely

    April 16, 2010 at 10:01 pm / 

    Blind Squirrel Digital is fully committed to you guys and all of Apple’s development platforms. We appreciate your willingness to share information with us, as well as working behind the scenes to insure your developer base has access to the platforms we know are changing the future of our World. It’s great to be a part of the Unity3D family. Keep up the great work Unity3D!

  56. Ashkan

    April 16, 2010 at 9:00 pm / 

    thank you DHL for your update
    i think it shows you everything from nothing. developers love you and are in your side. we might wait for the results and then by unity pro and unity iphone. i think if things like this keep happening apple will loose and even you find a way to support their platform many developers will become disapointed and don’t make big games for iphone. just 15 day plans :) i hope that the best will happen!

  57. Ugly Bug Ball

    April 16, 2010 at 8:49 pm / 

    What a refreshing, calm, and professional perspective. Whilst I feel strongly that Apple could have talked to some key platform providers (including yourselves and Adobe) before the release of the document, getting a meeting together to sit down and figure out a solution is a very sensible solution.

    Good luck in this and all of your company’s endeavours.

  58. DaveyJJ

    April 16, 2010 at 6:45 pm / 

    Once again the brilliant team at Unity provides their user base with timely info in the most professional of ways. It has been a delight to have been with you guys since the beginning, and you have shown your true dedication once again. Many thanks.

  59. Matthew

    April 16, 2010 at 5:54 pm / 

    Thank you for the update and thank you for taking the time to post.

  60. ThomasDotNet

    April 16, 2010 at 4:18 pm / 

    After this fiasco broke, I was left thinking about other platforms and started doing my research. Imagine my surprise to discover Unity will soon support Android and XBox! I’m more committed than ever to using Unity as the basis for a large part of my little software company.

  61. Dell Lawrence

    April 16, 2010 at 10:42 am / 

    Just wanted to add to my statement earlier:

    “So buy 3.0 and Unity iPhone 1.7 and keep on developing for iPad and iPhone. Don’t let the “worried” dev posts on this blog deter you from your iPad/iPhone dev plans. Don’t waste your time being an Apple hater, just get on with your dev project. Apple’s app store is still the best way to reach the user base of customers who will buy your game. If the game is worthy, you will succeed.”

    Keep developing your game, your code…. No matter what happens the structure and assets of your project will be intact and you can and should port your code to multiple platforms anyway. However I have a very good feeling that Unity and Apple will work things out to your advantage! This is based on watching these same issues play out over and over again in the SW industry. There is nothing abnormal happening here. So everyone please chill it’s going to be OK. Put your energy into making the best game you can!! This is my last post until Unity announces the results, back to designing our game!

    Peace out! Dell :)

  62. Adelia Bubak

    April 16, 2010 at 8:20 am / 

    Thx for this information. It’s much appreciated! Best regards.

  63. Tony

    April 15, 2010 at 9:56 pm / 

    If Apple really cared they would have notified companies like this ahead of time instead of having them respond to them in uncertainty with tail between legs :/.

    Dropping bombs like this on people is not how you treat them if you honestly value them, you work with them, ahead of time, not after the fact..

    Maybe Apple does this on purpose to scare people and make it easier for them to be controlled and come into compliance? That’s the only logic I can see behind it.

  64. Soulhuntre

    April 15, 2010 at 9:44 pm / 

    Whatever the outcome – it would be a good idea for developers to realize how much Apple loathes our existence as independents. Apple has no use for us, and no desire to “help” us.

    It is clear Apple assumes that developers will sit down, be quite and take whatever the give us. I can’t blame them, they certainly have every reason to believe that given how the more rabid of their users delight in doing exactly that.

    However, the message is clear – staying tied to Apple as a developer is a fast way to be locked in an ever shrinking box hoping Steve doesn’t decide he can finally live without you.

  65. Oskar

    April 15, 2010 at 9:22 pm / 

    Hope you will find a solution that satisfies apple. We shouldn’t be angry on them. They know what they are doing. With including of multitasking they need to be sure that all apps are full compatible with that and as optimized as posiible.
    Developers are that people who should bo compatible with OS API not opposite.

  66. Adam

    April 15, 2010 at 9:15 pm / 

    I have high hopes! Thanks David.

  67. David

    April 15, 2010 at 3:59 pm / 

    I’m still really disappointed over Apple for this. I have seen (and still see) them as a company to be admired for their innovation, marriage of art and technology and their attention to detail. I hope this all blows over, and I wish Unity best of luck as you are similarly doing great things and truly changing the industry. Thanks for the update.

  68. Martin Møller

    April 15, 2010 at 11:50 am / 

    #Reapazor(1)

    Ditto!

  69. Maph

    April 15, 2010 at 11:06 am / 

    Thank you for the update and constant communication!

    I really hope this will get worked out with Apple, and I have full faith in Unity that if it doesn’t work out, us iPhone developers will not get left in the cold!

    Keep us updated. :)

  70. Minevr

    April 15, 2010 at 4:43 am / 

    Hu Cares~~~

  71. Richard D

    April 15, 2010 at 4:08 am / 

    Thanks UNITY!! I know you guys can get this worked out. Thank you all for your great Service and Support. Thank you for the continued updates!

  72. Eric H

    April 15, 2010 at 3:59 am / 

    Im sure things will be fine.

    To this guy though, really? You don’t think Apple is going places, ignorance sure is bliss….

    Robert said on April 14th, 2010 at 10:04 pm:

    If it can’t be sorted out, I’ll be taking Unity’s side over Apple. At least Unity is going places.

  73. Joni de Campos

    April 15, 2010 at 12:54 am / 

    Thanks for your feed back. Keep up the good work !

  74. Francesco

    April 15, 2010 at 12:21 am / 

    we really appreciate your communication! good luck :) I’m sure Apple will find a solution for you… keep us updated!

  75. FugaSri

    April 14, 2010 at 11:54 pm / 

    Just like a lot of developers here, I’m also losing sleep while waiting for the official word from Apple. I hate it when my future is in somebody else’s hands but, no matter the outcome, I feel assured that Unity will help me take back what’s mine! Thanks David for keeping us in the information loop.
    P.S. – If your blog tab on your website was a real button I think I would have worn it down a bit with my constant obsessive checking.

  76. Brandon Perry

    April 14, 2010 at 11:49 pm / 

    you guys are bad asses

  77. Ben

    April 14, 2010 at 11:19 pm / 

    Good to see that something proactive is happening behind the scene.

    And looks like Apple’s not trying to kill all middleware after all.

    Hope the meeting will put that ever changing clause to rest once and for all.

  78. Robert Cummings

    April 14, 2010 at 11:18 pm / 

    Hi David,

    Keep up the good fight :)

  79. ScatterBrainGH

    April 14, 2010 at 11:10 pm / 

    Thanks very much for keeping us up-to-date!

  80. CrazyEoin

    April 14, 2010 at 11:02 pm / 

    Thanks for the update and all the hard work all of you unity folks are putting in!
    We really appreciate it :-)

  81. Wenceslao Villanueva

    April 14, 2010 at 10:52 pm / 

    Thank you for the update David. We appreciate the communication from Unity Technologies. Also, thanks to all of your employees for all the hard work! We look forward to seeing the resolution of this speed bump in the highway of awesomeness that Unity Tech has paved.

  82. KT

    April 14, 2010 at 10:47 pm / 

    How is Unity going to be the best engine when more than a dozen of games that I’ve downloaded shows a powered by unity and then crash.

    To be the best, it doesn’t involve only making the best damn engine, it’s about educating your developer community so they wouldn’t trash the image of your product.

    Cheers
    Looking forward to an answer soon wrt to 3.3.1

  83. David

    April 14, 2010 at 10:45 pm / 

    Thanks for keeping us updated! If Apple falls through, could us iPhone paying customers possibly get a discounted Android kit? ;-)

  84. Jclef

    April 14, 2010 at 10:42 pm / 

    Endless Thanks for the ongoing updates, Unity, and good luck with your meeting – we will sacrifice many Apples to a delicious pie in your honor!

  85. superwaugi

    April 14, 2010 at 10:40 pm / 

    …and it means everything to us that you are so comitted to make it work! all thumbs up! :-)

  86. Brad

    April 14, 2010 at 10:39 pm / 

    You guys are great!!!!!

  87. Blotnik

    April 14, 2010 at 10:34 pm / 

    Great News. To peace, love and understanding amongst Unity and Apple.

  88. MrT3D

    April 14, 2010 at 10:33 pm / 

    *Sorry for the typo in my previous post

    David it’s reassuring to read this update. You have a brilliant team completely capable of tackling this situation with Apple. Best luck in the meeting. Looking forward to more updates.

  89. Raj

    April 14, 2010 at 10:28 pm / 

    Thanks for the update David. We will keep our fingers crossed!

  90. Daniel Rodríguez

    April 14, 2010 at 10:23 pm / 

    I have the same feeling. Keep the good job Unity. You have the support of a lot of your customers.

  91. tau

    April 14, 2010 at 10:21 pm / 

    P.S. Hug Jobs for me :)

  92. tau

    April 14, 2010 at 10:21 pm / 

    Good move, UT folks, as usual. I think/predict you will create an SDK thingy as a static lib to be used on iPhone, which is a good thing, I was dreaming coding in C++ using Unity3D as SDK and not platform for PC/Mac based games.

    As for the rest, despite this Apple’s move, Apple wont change TOS just because some devs are throwing stones, trust me. In the end, who’ll stay and comply to Apple, will be making money in AppStore, while the rest will be sitting angry…

  93. Luke

    April 14, 2010 at 10:07 pm / 

    Unity = SERIOUS COMPANY! Have nothing more to add.

  94. MrT3D

    April 14, 2010 at 10:07 pm / 

    It’s David reassuring to read this update. You have a brilliant team completely capable of tackling this situation with Apple. Best luck in the meeting. Looking forward to more updates.

  95. Matias

    April 14, 2010 at 10:05 pm / 

    While i have somewhat worried about the future of Unity iPhone for the last few days, i am very much reassured by professionalism and dedication shown by the Unity team.

  96. Brian Williams

    April 14, 2010 at 10:05 pm / 

    It is not the end of the world i doubt i will upgrade my iphone first gen to a new iphone, especially now with OS4 essentially killing that gen off.

    oh and p.s i meant to say thank you

  97. Robert

    April 14, 2010 at 10:04 pm / 

    If it can’t be sorted out, I’ll be taking Unity’s side over Apple. At least Unity is going places.

  98. Esther Rock

    April 14, 2010 at 10:02 pm / 

    We appreciate your well measured response to both the community as well as with Apple. Even though many of us may have concerns about where things will be going, it is reassuring that we have people like yourself and Tom working so hard to make things right. I think the community as a whole feels as I do when it comes down to it.

  99. Brian

    April 14, 2010 at 10:01 pm / 

    I hope apple are just forcing out flash due to its stability and performance issues and not trying to isolate things that have no issues on their platform. I dont develop for iphone but if i ever did i would still use unity as its just the best no doubt or question about it. Coding with objective c and cocoa for game dev is awful so im sure apple wouldnt shoot themseves in the foot by blocking unity…. what with most of their app revenue coming from games.

  100. Leo Ngai

    April 14, 2010 at 10:01 pm / 

    Thank you for your update! You know we Unity fans will, as always, support Unity forever!

  101. Greg Dunn

    April 14, 2010 at 10:00 pm / 

    Thanks for the update, David. I’m a little anxious but feel confident that Unity will continue to provide *the* best platform for making 3D apps and experiences across the board.

  102. Loci

    April 14, 2010 at 10:00 pm / 

    Thank you! There is always a way, and I have full faith in the Unity Team to make it work. Thank you, so much, for the update.

  103. Reapazor

    April 14, 2010 at 9:59 pm / 

    Thanks for being so awesome Unity!

Comments are closed.