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This year, Unity sent a team to Phoenix, Arizona to connect with over 500 Latinx engineers at the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers National Convention. As a Technical Evangelist for Games, Arturo Núñez joined the group on the ground to talk more about what it’s like working at Unity. Read on to learn more about his experience at SHPE and the work he is building at Unity. 

What is SHPE? What does it mean to you?

SHPE is the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. Every year they host a national convention for Hispanic STEM students and professionals to learn, network, and seek out career opportunities. Although I recently learned about it, I was very excited to hear that there is an organization that invests in events like this to kickstart people’s careers.

What do you do at Unity? 

I’m an Evangelist for Games, which means I travel the world talking about Unity’s latest features and services to help developers be successful. Sometimes I’m working on demos and other times I’m talking to our community about our technology and all the different games created with our platform.

Can you tell us a little about your involvement in SHPE?

This year, for the first time, I had the chance to attend the SHPE National Convention and it was so much fun. My mission was to talk to people about career opportunities and internships at Unity, but in reality, most of my conversations were with really passionate students curious about game design, DOTS, graphics, and many other technical topics. There was even one person who stayed after the expo floor had closed just to chat with me. It was pretty amazing! 

What does your day-to-day look like? 

This is a hard question as every day is so different from the other. For example, one day I might be in Los Angeles talking about the Scriptable Render Pipeline and the next, I could be in Canada working on a demo for teaching 2D Animation Tools in Unity.

However, if I’m not traveling, I’m usually reading documentation, in meetings with other Unity teams, preparing content with Unity and Visual Studio, or connecting with the external community at game studios, user groups, and schools.

Where were you doing before joining Unity?

I was making independent games in Mexico City… using Unity, of course! 

Now at Unity, I get to see lots of great games and apps every day. I am impressed by how much I learn from the people I interact with on a daily basis.

What made you decide to work at Unity?

I have always been a long-time Unity fan, so when I was recruited to work here the decision was made in milliseconds.

What cool projects are you working on? 

I’m currently working with my team on a project that’s designed to make learning about Data Oriented Tech Stack (DOTS) as easy as possible. This is one of the greatest paradigm shifts in Unity, as we are moving toward a data-oriented approach to how we create our games. It’s very exciting! 

If you are interested, please take a look at this DOTS session playlist from Unite Copenhagen 2019.

Have you met any professional milestones at Unity? 

I always dreamed about presenting at events such as Unite, Game Developers Conference (GDC) and SIGGRAPH. At Unity, I’ve been given the opportunity to hit all three of these goals!

What do you enjoy about Unity company culture?

I enjoy the knowledge transfer between teams — it’s great to work with people that you admire because it makes you want to improve every day. One great example of this is when Silvia Rasheva (Producer on the Demo team) explained the real-time project, “ADAM” to me.  My mind exploded!

If you haven’t seen the project, you should check it out here.

What would you tell someone considering a career in your field?

Be ready to never stop learning. Things quickly evolve and change. The best asset you can have is the ability to learn and adapt. Unity is a great place to work because you get the chance to shape the future of real-time content. 

Interested? Take a look at the open positions and apply!

What’s the best piece of career advice you’ve ever gotten?

Have a goal and create a plan to achieve it. The plan to achieve the goal is the most important part because, with it, you can always see how close you are to achieving it.

What’s your favorite video game?

Conker’s Bad Fur Day on the Nintendo 64.

What’s your favorite non-Unity related activity?

I enjoy horror in most of its forms: literature, movies, and games — so you can find me reading, watching, or playing anything horror-related.

What is your favorite made with Unity experience and why?

It’s a difficult choice, but I have to say it’s Cuphead. It’s just so pretty. It shows us that gorgeous graphics doesn’t always have to mean photorealistic graphics. 

What excites you most about the future of Unity?

I’m excited for a time when every person in the world can create interactive content, no matter their background or experience. I’d love for everyone to be able to interact with Unity in the same way people do with word-processors today.  

Anything else you want people to know about you or Unity?

I’m always happy to help, so please reach out to me on twitter: @ArturoNereu.

If you are interested in learning more about Unity Technologies and opportunities to be apart of teams like Arturo’s Evangelism team, check out our careers page!   

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  1. SebastianValdnegro

    11月 24, 2019 6:42 am 返信

    As a latino the virtue signaling in this post make me cringe, just call us Latinos, our language say “Latinos” not “Latinxs”

  2. It kind of looks like, “hey guys, here’s out token hispanic”. I’m feeling bad for the guy. Unity, get your sh*t together!

  3. The virtue signaling is over 9000 here. Look it’s cool that you’re equal opportunity hiring but that in itself already gives enough benefits. You don’t have to start bragging about it. Sets a very weird mood, like you’re not hiring latinxs people for their merits but because they are latinxs..

    1. The funny thing is that “latinX” is just “englishwashing”, even the inclusive language used is really only used by far left people and highly mocked by society in general (it uses an E instead of an X that is pretty unpronounceable in spanish).
      I bet the guy doesn’t really cares and it’s not his fault, he’s just humoring them and let them pat themselves on the back.

  4. Um…..Cool?

    I am trying to think of one other multi billion dollar company that shows off profiles of its staff in blog posts and I am struggling to think of even one, but….not doing any harm I guess?

    On the flipside, not sure what majority of readership are gaining from this either?