Unity and the augmented reality boom

August 13, 2013 in Community

Currently, there’s an explosion of Augmented Reality (AR) projects, with fifteen new Unity-based apps appearing on the App Store alone everyday. They add a virtual layer to the real world that you can see through a camera or in a special display.

AR brings radical innovations to countless areas, from guiding tourists and selling air conditioning to building aircraft carriers. But it can go even further than that. Some predict AR will bring about the era of natural computing that will free us from staring into monitors all day.

Films like Iron Man or Minority Report show what this could one day look like. But AR is already a practical feature that provides a livelihood to a number of studios.  One of them is Dutch studio TWNKLS, which won the industry’s Auggie Award with its Otolift app. Using a few markers and an iPad, it shows clients exactly how a staircase lift would change their home and gathers precise measurements for manufacturing.

A more everyday example is Birthday Card AR by Fuzzy Logic, a studio based in South Africa. It’s a free to play interactive experience for children, who can view the birthday cards through an app to see them come to life with flowers and dinosaurs.

Unity editor extensions like Vuforia are used to build apps that recognize real world markers which trigger content displayed on a device. “If you want the smoothest tracking of markers like photos or graphical materials, look no further than Qualcomm Vuforia, it is amazing,” says CTO of TWNKLS Lex van der Sluijs. Jason Ried of Fuzzy Logic adds that it’s easy to learn: “They have a number of easy to follow tutorials which we would recommend – and once you’ve completed them you can just start experimenting with ideas of your own.”

Performance headaches

Device performance can be a major headache for AR app developers. “The video camera feed and the image tracking algorithms take a large chunk of the processing time, so we have to be careful with the complexity of our skinned characters,” says Jason Ried.  Lex van der Sluijs also found that full screen video in a scene with AR tracking can easily crash an app.

Currently, AR is also limited by the size of device displays, whether it’s a mobile device used as a “magic lens” or a stationary display used as a “magic mirror”. Even when playing Sharky the Beaver, which uses a real robot instead of a marker, users still have to carry their smartphone around to see it.  CEO of TWNKLS Gerben Harmsen says that one obstacle for mainstream adoption of AR is the lack of really good AR glasses.

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This is where meta comes in, a project that started at Columbia University and in less than a year raised funds to create hardware with features that go beyond those of Google Glasses. meta’s glasses show a natural field of vision. They’re coupled with a gesture recognition camera that enables interaction with virtual objects.

Unity as the springboard

“We predict that in the future, Unity will become something of an operating system for AR, because it provides a great pipeline to work with 3D assets,” says meta founder and CEO Meron Gribetz.

Since its successful Kickstarter, meta has been busy getting the SDK out of the door, so that the 500 interested developers they’ve initially registered can get cracking in Unity creating apps for the platform and more can join in. GameDraw, has been the first app to port to meta. Based on the popular Unity asset, it enables sculpting 3D models with hand gestures.

Eyes on fashion, pioneers on board

The meta 1 Developer Kit, with hardware based on Epson and SoftKinetic gear, will ship in September, but the consumer version promises to be very different than the clunky prototype, and future iterations will follow eyewear fashion. Meta collaborates with product designer Martin Hasek, whose slick LoadAR concept glasses were originally aimed at Google. At the same time, meta is deeply rooted in the ideas of AR visionaries, like its chief scientist, Steve Mann, a pioneer of wearable computing, and adviser Steve Feiner, who has been working on interactive glasses technology since 1990.

For Gerben Harmsen, AR goes even deeper than “just” replacing the computer: “As humans we live as much in the physical world as in the intangible world of relationships, stories, information, emotion, the future and the past. In that sense, ‘augmented reality’ is simply the next big step in bringing these worlds closer together. For example, an app for designing rooms is a way to bring your future interior into the here and now”.

Is the AR revolution around the corner? The innovations come so fast that it’s hard to tell what’s realistic and what’s still sci-fi. One thing is certain: if it happens, Unity will be a part of it. Jason Ried calls Unity an “absolutely integral” tool for AR and he’s far from the only one. “We feel that Unity truly is the best platform for creating both game- and non-game AR applications,” says Gerbern Harmsen.

 ar unity

Comments (13)

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  1. Stephanie

    August 27, 2013 at 12:38 pm / 

    I made a prototype with my team for Dare to Be Digital using Unity’s Vuforia plugin! A lot of the children had never seen AR before and loved it!

    I’m glad to see an AR boom!

    Here is a small trailer for DinerSaur: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXE6RifCvq0

  2. Elecman

    August 19, 2013 at 2:29 pm / 

    Unity seems to claim that they are at the forefront of AR. However, there are some serious issues that need to be resolved on the side of Unity.

    First of all, the WebcamTexture cannot be used for AR because you cannot access the raw pixel data fast enough for realtime applications. To solve this problem you need to write a native plugin for every single platform. That is not really the “Unity” way of doing things. Currently the WebcamTexture is useless for AR unless you want to use the inferior accelerator/compass instead of computer vision for tracking.

    Secondly, there is currently no way of making an AR app for the Web Player. This is because the Web Player does not support plugin. But as mentioned before, plugins are the only way to make AR run fast enough on Unity.

    Luckily there are plugins available like Vuforia, String, Metaio, Obvious Engine, PointCloud, etc. But Web apps are still impossible.

  3. Christy Dean

    August 19, 2013 at 12:18 pm / 

    Its a very good topic on unity & augmentation. Useful for the new generation app developers. We also built a Power Nap App for the users facing napping problems. Its very helpful in rejuvenating your mind and body and regenerates the freshness in few minutes. We are also showcasing this app in the coming Gitex Technology Week 2013, going to held at Dubai in the coming October.

  4. Noisecrime

    August 17, 2013 at 11:37 am / 

    AR is a very exciting technology, personally I’ve been using Vuforia to make a few apps. The most recent for an exhibition kiosk for the Russian Copper Company, where we used chroma-keying to add pre-recorder actors onto a physical model of a mine, a promo video and more information can be found here https://www.facebook.com/pages/Noisecrime-Productions/245223338862218

  5. Ashish Verma

    August 14, 2013 at 7:21 pm / 

    Thats GREAT!

    Hey friends, I also released my new game ma 2nd game
    build using UNITY3D indie and Vuforia AR SDK

    REAL MAZE 3D Augmented Reality Maze Game :)
    https://www.facebook.com/RealMaze3DAugmentedReality

    Friends, pls like my facebook page above and check out the game download links.

    Cheers to UNITY AND AR ;) ;) :) :)

  6. filippi

    August 14, 2013 at 2:21 pm / 

    Guys, I put my project on air yesterday, please help me spread! Thank you too if posting on Facebook, or on twitter! The link is this:

    http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magi-in-the-land-of-mor-a-new-adventure-in-the-best-arcade-style/x/4283231

    Thank you =)

  7. Chris

    August 14, 2013 at 8:02 am / 

    Here is a game that me and a couple of friends made over a long period of time.
    http://afterthegods.com/
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuQjzYSCgRc

  8. Dwair

    August 14, 2013 at 12:16 am / 

    I only have one question regarding AR… will unity support Google glass? yes? pretty please?

  9. Lex van der Sluijs

    August 13, 2013 at 10:53 pm / 

    Small correction, that should be ” Lex van der Sluijs also found that the combination of full screen display *of a video* in a scene with AR tracking can easily crash an app”.

    Ultimately we fixed this though: first by using the Mobile Movie Texture component by Defiant, and in later apps by using the “Video Playback” component from Vuforia.

    1. Kristyna Paskova

      August 14, 2013 at 5:33 pm / 

      Good point! It’s been fixed. Thanks for the input!

  10. Karl Swannie

    August 13, 2013 at 10:52 pm / 

    Our team has been using Unity for Security, Architecture, Mapping and Planning. We recently coupled Unity with the Oculus Rift and held an Open House. The results were spectacular:

    http://youtu.be/WW8FaXpklUM

  11. Amanda L.

    August 13, 2013 at 8:50 pm / 

    Metaio’s SDK also works with the Unity 3D Plugin.

    We’re actually having a free webinar this Thursday, August 15, about advance interactions: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5764234041311885568. You can check it out along with other Unity + Metaio webinars at https://dev.metaio.com.

    What’s unique about Metaio is that it’s not limited to just image tracking. You can also SLAM (real time environment tracking) and 3D object tracking. Check it out!

  12. Will Brett

    August 13, 2013 at 7:19 pm / 

    I have built and Augmented Reality app using unity to encourage children to be socially interactive. Unity is by far the best choice for apps like these. I would be more than happy to take some photos or create a short video if interested?

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